Western Wednesdays: DJANGO

Director Sergio Corbucci
Year 1966
Starring Franco Nero, José Bódalo, Loredana Nusciak, Ángel Álvarez, Gino Pernice
Run Time 92min
Age Policy

18 and up; Children 6 and up will be allowed only with a parent guardian. No children under the age of 6 will be allowed.

More Info IMDb
Official Website

Experience one of the best classic Italian Westerns at the Alamo with an ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT Spaghetti Option (NOT included in the ticket) on our menu! 

Sergio Corbucci's influential 1966 spaghetti Western, long unseen in theatres, inspired Quentin Tarantino (RESERVOIR DOGS' infamous ear-cutting scene is a direct reference) and is now being tributed in Tarantino's newest, DJANGO UNCHAINED. It's time to revisit the original that spawned over 30 sequels and cemented the genre as an international phenomenon. Starring Franco Nero as the title character, a horseless, dark-clad, blazingly blue-eyed stranger dragging a coffin through the mud of a desolate frontier town, DJANGO mixes up a bloody ragù of Confederates, bandidos, Klansmen, dance hall gals, and a bloody trail of too-slow-on-the-draw bad men. Says Time Out: "Rates alongside [Sergio] Leone's Dollars trilogy as one of the daddies of the spaghetti Western.... Corbucci's style is a mix of social realism, highly decorative visuals, and finely mounted action sequences. For the rest, there are enough mud-wrestling prostitutes, whippings, ear-loppings, explosions and scenes of wholesale slaughter to keep any muchacho happy. Funny, visceral, bloody, no-nonsense entertainment with a touch of class." In Italian. (Fully subtitled)

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