THE GOONIES

Director Richard Donner
Year 1985
Starring Sean Astin, Josh Brolin, Jeff Cohen
Rating PG
Run Time 114min
Age Policy

18 and up; Children 6 and up will be allowed only with a parent guardian. No children under the age of 6 will be allowed.

More Info IMDb

Join us in celebrating the 30th anniversary of THE GOONIES!

George Roy Hill's THE WORLD OF HENRY ORIENT (1964) and Don Coscarelli's KENNY & COMPANY (1976) showed the world that movies about kids didn't need to be stupid. Or pandering. Or maudlin. They just needed to be genuine. And fun. They needed to capture what it feels like to be twelve-years-old -- every moment a jumping-off point for something bigger, filled with discovery and unstoppable invincibility.

Since most adults are idiots, this is not an easy task. But like Hill and Coscarelli before them, director Richard Donner and scriptwriters Steven Spielberg and Christopher Columbus captured something special.

THE GOONIES is a near-perfect snapshot of what it feels like to be a kid caught in a fantastic situation. But it's also near-perfect entertainment for everyone else. From the hilarious and quotable exchanges ("I'm setting booty traps!") to the positive reinforcement of how triumphant life can be when you have great friends, this is the definition of a "feel good" movie.

Whether you're 78 or 11, whether you've watched it four-hundred-and-fifty-two times or you're seeing it for the first time, THE GOONIES never changes. It never degrades. It remains a smart, thrilling volcano of adventure that makes the world a better place. It also has ghost pirates. (Joe Ziemba)

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