The Halloween Trilogy Triple Feature

Director John Carpenter, Rick Rosenthal, Tommy Lee Wallace
Year 1978, 1981, 1982
Starring Jamie Lee Curtis, Donald Pleasence, Tom Atkins
Rating R
Run Time 281min
Age Policy

18 and up; Children 6 and up will be allowed only with a parent guardian. No children under the age of 6 will be allowed.

Join us Halloween night, October 31st, for the perfect Triple Feature! Come in costume and Trick-Or-Treat between shows! Three shows, one ticket! Parts II & III shown on 35mm film!

Included in the Halloween Triple Feature:
HALLOWEEN (1978) - The night that HE came home! John Carpenter's horror classic introduced us to a young man named Michael Myers "with the devil's eyes" who escapes a mental hospital to come back to Haddonfield, IL and terrorize a group of babysitters (including Jamie Lee Curtis and P.J. Soles) while being pursued by his doctor (Donald Pleasence) who knows all too well the terror coming to town.

HALLOWEEN II (1981) - This sequel came out three years after the original but picks up at the precise moment of that film's shocking ending. Laurie Strode (Jamie Lee Curtis) is taken to the hospital where the staff of Haddonfield Memorial has NO idea the evil that's coming their way. Dr. Loomis (Donald Pleasence) will stop at nothing to find Michael and keep the scares of Halloween from lasting another 24 hours.

HALLOWEEN III: SEASON OF THE WITCH (1982) - This entry in the series takes a break from the Michael Myers storyline but concocts its own genius story of the mysterious Silver Shamrock mask company that pops up in Santa Mira, CA selling this season's hottest costumes, but underneath it all is wild plot that may bring about the end of civilization as we know it and only Dr. Dan Challis (Tom Atkins) may hold the key to stopping a chain of terrifying events.  

 

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