STAR TREK Double Feature

Director J.J. Abrams
Rating PG-13
Run Time 256min
Age Policy

18 and up; Children 6 and up will be allowed only with a parent guardian. No children under the age of 6 will be allowed.

STAR TREK (2009)
Set before the original TV series, this JJ Abrams extravaganza gives us an action-packed lesson in the shared history of lil' Cap'n Kirk and and his stone-faced friend, Spock. Zachary Quinto (HEROES) stars as the young Spock (while Leonard Nimoy returns to the iconic role to play the half-Vulcan, half-human in his advancing age!). And Chris Pine fills the sizable shoes of the legendary captain of the USS Enterprise made famous by William Shatner. But what may be the greatest bit of casting of all time ever is Simon Pegg (SHAUN OF THE DEAD) as Scotty and Eric Bana (HULK, CHOPPER) as the nemesis of the Enterprise!

STAR TREK INTO DARKNESS 3D
J.J. Abrams 2009 re-imagining of the beloved sci-fi series kind of blew everyone away. Nobody was sure if it would succeed at feeling fresh while also catering to the show’s die-hard fanbase. The overwhelming repsonse from audiences was: mission accomplished. Now Abrams looks to strike lightning twice with STAR TREK INTO DARKNESS. When the crew of the Enterprise is called back home, they find an unstoppable force of terror has detonated the fleet and everything it stands for, leaving our world in a state of crisis. Captain Kirk leads a manhunt to a war-zone world to capture the one-man weapon of mass destruction. Soon our heroes find themselves propelled into an epic chess game of life and death. Benedict Cumberbatch joins the cast as the epic, evil villain. It looks like Abrams was just getting his feet wet with the first STAR TREK. Get ready.

Drafthouse News

Interview with Edgar Wright, Simon Pegg and Nick Frost

Interview with Edgar Wright, Simon Pegg and Nick Frost

Mr. Wright is manic and not unlike Tim Burton in demeanour and energy, while Mr. Pegg is calmer with a voice that, in person, sounds surprisingly like Terence Stamp's. Mr. Frost is surprisingly quiet; I don't think he was feeling well.

A Little Controversy to Start the Week

A Little Controversy to Start the Week

It’s telling that Pixar guru John Lasseter counts Japanese Studio Ghibli master Hayao Miyazaki as his key influence.  If animation in the United States ever has a chance to be something more than instantly devalued as a “children’s” medium, it’s in their hands.