REAL GENIUS

Director Martha Coolidge
Year 1985
Starring Val Kilmer, Gabriel Jarrett, William Atherton
Rating PG
Run Time 108min
More Info IMDb

Mitch is one of the youngest students ever accepted to a university known for its programs for geniuses. His roommate and partner, Chris Knight, is the superstar of smarts who has hobbies that violate the laws of gravity, homework that could win a Nobel Prize, and an IQ higher than most people can count. But, when Chris makes the scientific discovery of the century, his classmates want the credit, his professor wants the publicity, and the military want to use his discovery as the ultimate weapon...but no one should ever try to outsmart a REAL GENIUS!

Prepare to turn the simple into the simply amazing in this gut-busting science project masterpiece from the mind that brought you BACHELOR PARTY and SURF NINJAS. Kilmer stars, in his second leading role (you know, after TOP SECRET), as resident brainiac, toxic waste-lover Chris, who begrudgingly takes a weirdo new kid under his wing as he continues to charm the ladies and invent elaborate science projects strictly for partying purposes.

This movie is guaranteed to make you want to be smarter and party harder as you follow this gang of hyper-kinetic kids down the rabbit hole of big blasts, frozen hallways, and houses full of popcorn. Who ELSE can turn lasers into light shows, aircraft into armchairs, and high-tech into hijinks? (Greg MacLennan)

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