IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE

Director Frank Capra
Year 1946
Starring James Stewart, Donna Reed and Lionel Barrymore
Run Time 130min
Age Policy

18 and up; Children 6 and up will be allowed only with a parent guardian. No children under the age of 6 will be allowed.

More Info IMDb

Jimmy Stewart and Frank Capra have said multiple times that IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE remained the favorite production and finished film each one was ever worked on.

Over time the film has gained notoriety as a seminal holiday classic and has been given the distinction of being a sentimental and sometimes corny gem about what’s important in life. This couldn’t be further from the truth.

In fact Capra’s film is one of the psychologically darker and emotional rich Hollywood productions of the 1940’s. That’s not to say it isn't uplifting, but the undertones, which were no doubt brought upon by each man’s experience in WWII, allow for a very mature and complex experience.

So if you’ve skipped this film because of its reputation as a light, happy Christmas movie do yourself a favor and see this undisputed classic. And if you’re already a fan you can watch it on the big screen at the Alamo. (R.J. LaForce)

“It’s a great -- really great -- film, so densely well made that to watch any three minutes is to realize how paltry the vast majority of movies are by comparison.”  - Richard T. Jameson

“The epiphany of movie sentiment and a transcendent experience.”  - Dave Kehr

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