Austin News

|

TRIPLE FISHER Shoots the Village in the Face on 5/9

In this Rashomon of found footage film, director Dan Kapelovitz mind-melds the multiple melodramas into one ultimate metadrama mashup!

TRIPLE FISHER Shoots the Village in the Face on 5/9

A scathing critique/celebration of early-’90s tabloid culture, twenty years in the making!

In 1992, a suburban New York teenager named Amy Fisher captured the national media’s attention when she shot her lover’s wife in the face. This sordid tale of underage sex, aggravated assault, and Joey Buttafuoco managed to spawn not one, not two, but three separate made-for-TV movies — a television first. Drew Barrymore (THE AMY FISHER STORY), Alyssa Milano (CASUALTIES OF LOVE: THE LONG ISLAND LOLITA STORY) and Noëlle Parker (LETHAL LOLITA - AMY FISHER: MY STORY) all took stabs at portraying the disturbed young lady, yet a true on-screen depiction of Amy Fisher has never emerged — until now.

In this Rashomon of found footage film, director Dan Kapelovitz (“Threee Geniuses”) mind-melds the multiple melodramas into one ultimate metadrama mashup! 

“Unspools like a Lifetime movie fever dream, with its labyrinth of duplicating lurid set-pieces taking on the tone of a noirish nightmare, reaching a frenzied schizo climax that would make Brian De Palma proud.” says Videology curator Andrew Miller.

 

“I had the idea about 20 years ago, when the made-for-TV movies first aired,” Kapelovitz said via email. “It would have been a nightmare to edit the film back then because I wouldn’t have had access to a digital editing system, and would have had to edit the film using VCRs.” ”There have been stories that have received more coverage with today’s 24-hour news cycle, basically anything that’s on Nancy Grace’s show,” he went on, “but the Amy Fisher saga was the first tabloid story — and I’m pretty sure the last — to have all three major networks air their own made-for-TV movie.” 

Which leads us to the most obvious, important question here: which Amy is the best? “Noëlle Parker is the most realistic,” he says. “She is also the most likeable, but that’s partly because she stars in the movie that is based on the real Amy Fisher’s version of events. In that one Joey is this evil manipulator who convinces Amy to become a prostitute, and Amy’s father is a total creep, so you kind of feel sorry for her.” Milano is also serviceable as “stalker” Amy, as is Barrymore as “middle” Amy.

Now that his Fisher opus has finally come to fruition, Kapelovitz may focus his efforts on a similar mashup of Fisher and Buttafuoco’s respective “celebrity” sex tapes (“I’d have to show it in a theater that is equipped like the one in A Clockwork Orange,” he notes), but isn’t grasping too hard for an overarching moral to the saga. “I guess for Joey, I’d say that when a cop says, ‘I may be wrong, but I’m pretty sure they took the statutory sex laws off the books,’ he’s probably lying.” Solid advice if ever there was. – The L Magazine

One screening only, one unmissable night at the Alamo Drafthouse Village.

Buy your tickets now!!!

Comments

blog comments powered by Disqus