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See COMIC-CON EPISODE IV - A FAN’S HOPE at West Oaks next Saturday

Have you ever wanted to be a programmer at the Alamo Drafthouse? Tugg, a new service for crowdsourcing film events, offers your chance to program your favorite films at a theater, promote the event and pack the house for a night of movie-watching bliss.

See COMIC-CON EPISODE IV - A FAN’S HOPE at West Oaks next Saturday

Have you ever wanted to be a programmer at the Alamo Drafthouse? Tugg, a new service for crowdsourcing film events, offers your chance to program your favorite films at a theater, promote the event and pack the house for a night of movie-watching bliss.

Space City Con, an upcoming fan convention coming to Houston in August, is working with Tugg to program a screening of the excellent new documentary COMIC-CON EPISODE IV - A FAN'S HOPE. In order for this screening to happen, though, you MUST pre-order your tickets online here.

If enough tickets for this event (or any Tugg event) aren’t ordered in advance, the screening just won’t happen – this way Tugg can guarantee it covers the cost to screen the film in Houston. If you want COMIC-CON EPISODE IV - A FAN'S HOPE to play on the big screen (and you should, it’s a great movie), it’s up to you to make sure it happens.

COMIC-CON EPISODE IV - A FAN'S HOPEis an entertaining look at the modern state of the San Diego Comic-Con. Morgan Spurlock directs the film — backed by an all-star producing team that includes Stan Lee, Joss Whedon and Harry Knowles. While Spurlock is known to insert himself judiciously into the documentaries he films, this is not a love letter to Spurlock’s ego. The director wisely chose to step back from the spotlight and instead let the film’s subjects speak for themselves. Thankfully, Spurlock chose a team of subjects that are just as entertaining as himself.

A series of vignettes, the documentary follows several groups of Comic-Con attendees as they prepare for and attend the world’s largest comic book convention. From Skip Harvey, a young man hoping to break into the business with his art portfolio, to James Darling, a young geek in love who met his girlfriend at the previous year’s convention and hopes to propose to her at this year’s Kevin Smith Q&A panel, the film has a nice mix of subjects to follow.

There’s the owner of Mile High Comics, the leader in back issue comic book providers. As he prepares to bring a hefty supply of books to the convention, he pensively muses about how much the convention has changed in recent years and ponders if it is truly even a comic book convention anymore.

As to drive home that point, another subject Spurlock follows is a young costume designer who spends months before the convention meticulously designing and building replica costumes from the video game Mass Effect. Some of her costumes featuring animatronics, the designer puts the same amount of work on building her suits as most parents put into raising a child. She hopes to gain some attention for her craft and possibly land a job in the industry from her work.

This focus on Comic-Con as a job market for geeks is something that separates Spurlock’s film from other movies set at conventions. It’s captivating (and a bit heartbreaking at times) to see conventioneers attempt time and time again to press flesh and court major publishers for a job as an illustrator. This focus on adult responsibility is something you don’t often get to see in a film about geekdom.

COMIC-CON is a fun documentary and really, in a world where some documentaries could put an insomniac to sleep, a fun documentary about the communal experience that is Comic-Con is a nice gift to the thousands of fans who call San Diego their home one week out of every year.

Pre-order your tickets here

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